The Inevitable #Gamergate post

Note: Comments will be very heavily moderated. Keep it civil, people. Harassment of myself and others will not be tolerated – in any direction, for any reason. I will tolerate harassment neither of or by Gamergaters.
A brief introduction, as to why I care. The Gamergate (or #Gamergate) movement has blown wider and stronger than I think anyone expected, and there’s a strong sentiment I hear of “Why does anybody care? It’s just video games.” Here’s why: because if people aren’t safe playing video games and talking about video games when they express differing opinions, then people aren’t safe talking about anything. And when one group’s safety (in this case, women) is compromised, everyone’s safety is compromised. But still, to many, it’s a hypothetical. To me, it’s personal. These are my people. Geek women are my people. I will not stand by in silence as we are driven away from the things we love. I will not stand back and be a silent witness to #Gamergatekeeping any longer.
Now, onward to my thoughts about this specific situation.
Let me state first that there are some serious problems in gaming journalism, and in gaming criticism. There are some major problems of corruption in the gaming industry. This is no surprise, given that it has rapidly changed from a niche market into a multi-billion dollar industry.
That said, these facts are mostly unrelated to Gamergate. I feel for the people who have gathered under the #Gamergate hashtag with the honest intent of addressing these issues, I really do, but it’s time for those people to wake up, realize that the hashtag has been tainted beyond all redemption by things like the threat of a school shooting and the harassment of women to a point that it’s driving creative people out of the industry based on their gender, and find a different hashtag under which to assemble, if they really want to address these issues.
Anyone claiming after serious research that this movement began with a journalistic concern is in a state of massive denial. The proof is there that the so-called “Quinnspiracy” is nothing more than a sad case of revenge porn on the part of an ex-boyfriend with an axe to grind, and not a legitimate axe at that. The origins of Gamergate lie with a trumped-up case brought against a woman whose worst actual action might have been cheating on him with someone she knew who did not in fact write a review of her game, and more likely her worst action was simply moving on after the relationship ended.
After that point, somehow, Gamergaters managed to get their resources in line enough to deliberately bring on board some people with legitimate concerns about the gaming industry and gaming journalism. But the harassment hasn’t stopped. And the rejection of women’s views hasn’t stopped. Any legitimacy the movement might ever stand to gain is blocked by these two facts.
To me, the scariest thing is that this movement has gained momentum, rather than losing it. The saddest thing is that it’s tainting the entire community of gamers. I’m hopeful that, with recent media events such as the lashing from the Colbert Report, that trend will reverse.
I’m also sad that there are some decent people who believe that Gamergate is the best hope they have of making positive change concerning some real issues in the industry, and those people are getting their very real concerns mixed up with some really unsavory practices, in many cases without realizing it. I’d like to address those people now.
Let me be clear about a few other things.
It is absolutely okay to disagree with someone.
It is absolutely okay to believe that someone’s views are irrelevant.
It is absolutely okay to critique someone’s practices.
It is absolutely okay to critique someone’s publications.
It is absolutely not okay to threaten or harass.
It is absolutely not okay to blacklist.
It is absolutely not okay to impose your ideas of what is relevant on the rest of the world.
It is absolutely not okay to career-block someone and defame their character based on a misconceived notion of law and accepted practice.
Even those who have legitimate concerns about the state of the industry are guilty of some of the above actions. For example, those who believe that feminism should not be included in game review because ideology should not be a part of game criticism. First of all, ideology is always a part of criticism. There is no such thing as an objective review, never has been, never will be. Movies are reviewed through the lens of the reviewers’ ideologies, as are books. If games are being reviewed this way, this is a good thing, a sign that the form is being accepted as worthy of genuine academic examination.
If you would rather people not include feminism as one of those ideologies because it’s not one you subscribe to, it’s your right to find and read exclusively reviews that don’t do that. But it is not your right to publicly defame the character and career of the reviewers that do, or to try to silence them and pretend that they have no right to disagree with you. I personally believe that the portrayal of women in video games is one of the signs of corruption in the industry, and that people like Anita Sarkeesian, flawed though her specific criticisms certainly are at times (and that’s a conversation I’d be more than happy to have in another place, maybe the comments section), are doing much more to move the industry forward than any part of Gamergate has managed to do so far, if only because she invites discussion and diversity of viewpoints while Gamergate seeks silence. I would encourage you to go start your own review site for people with other views. I think you’d get a lot of traffic, and I think it’s important that a variety of viewpoints be catered to in the publication of game reviews. If you disagree with my views, I think that’s great, and if you have a place you can find reviews that will reliably tell you whether or not you will like a game because the reviewer thinks along similar lines to you, that’s excellent. I need the same thing, and the same reviewer won’t be able to write for both of us, because we’re just too different in what we’re looking for in a game, if you don’t care about how women are portrayed. I don’t want reviews that focus on breast physics, but I’m okay with simply being able to avoid those that do; why can’t you, if you don’t want feminist-oriented reviews, do me the same courtesy?
I realize that if game reviews were to take a similar route to movie, book, and art reviews, it would change the way publicity in the industry works on a very fundamental level. I also think that would be an excellent thing, because it would further legitimize games as an artistic medium worthy of academic and artistic examination, and would grow the industry in progressive and healthy ways. Objectivity in reviews isn’t possible, because reviews are inherently subjective. Variety and diversity, however, can ensure that we all have our needs met, and will raise the general quality of the work produced in both the game industry itself and in the surrounding journalism.
If you really care about integrity in gaming publicity, I also encourage you to find a different hashtag under which to assemble, because for all of your good intentions, this one started out as a deliberate campaign to end the career and the personal peace of one woman out of a sense of sexual revenge, and has since become irrevocably associated with the harassment, threatening, and silencing of women. If you really don’t believe that behavior is okay, then do something about it. Don’t give me “not all Gamergaters,” I know that already and I don’t need to hear it again. Go back and look at the #YesAllWomen hashtag on Twitter for a while, see what happened when that went viral a while ago, and come back when you’re done, because it’s starting to seem like it would function as a response to #NotAllGamergaters, even to #NotAllGamers.
I value the gaming community, because it’s my community. Gamers are my people. Geeks are my people. But. So are women. So are people with disabilities. I don’t want to be told that because of one part of who I am, I can’t be part of a community that represents another part of who I am. I understand that not everyone who has associated with Gamergate has that experience, and that’s wonderful for you, but there are far too many people who have had that experience, and it needs to stop. I don’t want people to have a bad idea about who we are as gamers, because of the fact that you and I can’t have a conversation.
And if you really are okay with seeing some change happen to make our beloved hobby into a healthier industry for everyone, even if it’s a little scary, even if it means getting used to some new ways of figuring out what you’re going to play next, I look forward to exploring that with you. If not, I very much fear this conversation is in fact over.
I shouldn’t have been afraid to make this post. The fact that I was, because I’ve seen what happens to women who criticize Gamergate, is telling.
You know what would make me happiest, Gamergate? If you proved me wrong. If you took control of the movement, broke your silence, made it clear that harassment is not acceptable, reached out to the women who have been victimized and driven from their homes. If you informed yourselves of journalistic practice, and sponsored a diversity in the types of reviews and criticism that are out there, as well as supporting integrity in factual reporting, and combating the very real corruption that does exist, without trampling on others’ right to free speech. If you made Gamergate – under this or any other name – into the movement you want it to be, rather than the mess it currently is.
Make no mistake, denial won’t get you there. And Gamergate is one of the greatest threats to gaming I have seen in a long time, as it’s bringing back questions in mass media of what “damage” gaming can do to people. These issues were almost, almost put to rest, before people started threatening to kill people for expressing different views, and now Gamergate is on the SLPC Hatewatch. There are still enough people out there who don’t know what’s going on and don’t care to research it, that there is a serious danger of widespread misinformation about gamers as a whole. And because I’m not part of Gamergate and refuse to associate myself with its origins and common practices, my best option is to just say my piece, and wait for the response, whatever form it takes.
And that also should not be as frightening as it is.